catasters:

Rasta Cat Say "Let’s go burn one catnip…"

catasters:

Rasta Cat Say "Let’s go burn one catnip…"

Reblogged from
verticalfood:

Churros Rellenos - Tijuana (by Cathy Danh)

verticalfood:

Churros Rellenos - Tijuana (by Cathy Danh)

Reblogged from everybody loves to eat

museumofmodernerotica said: Maybe this is a crazy question, but how did Europeans know what Africans looked like? I know that some of the paintings here are of North Africans/Middle Easterners, but others clearly depict people born south of the Sahara. I've heard of Prester John but I never imagined that medieval Europeans were aware that Prester John would have had brown skin. Am I missing something?

medievalpoc:

Like. There are a lot of things I could say here. But I’m just going to do my best to answer your question, and the answer is either very simple or very complicated, depending on your current point of view.

1. “They” knew what people with brown skin looked like because people with brown skin had been there literally THE ENTIRE TIME. Some (and father back, ALL) of “them” had brown skin themselves.

2. “People with Brown Skin” and “Europeans” are not separate and mutually exclusive groups.

3. No matter how far back you go, the mythical time that you’re looking for, when all-white, racially and culturally isolated Europe was “real”, will continue to recede from your grasp until it winkles out the like imaginary place it is.

We can just keep going back. In every area, from all walks of life, rich and poor, kings and peasants, artists and iconoclasts, before there were countries and continents, before there were white people.

Russia, 1899:

image

Switzerland, c. 1800:  [fixed link here]

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Netherlands, 1658:

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Poland, 1539:

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Germany, 1480s:

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Spain, 1420s:

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France, 1332:

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Scotland, England, France, 1280s:

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France, 1220s:

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England, 1178:

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Belgium, 1084:

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Greece, c. 1000:

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Spain, 850s:

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Throughout Europe, 800s-500s:

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England, c. 300 AD:

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Scotland, c. 100 AD:

image

image

Italy, 79 AD:

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Greece, 170 B.C.:

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Greece, 300 B. C.:

image

Greece, 400s B.C.

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Greece, 500s B.C.:

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Egypt, 1200s B.C.:

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Crete (Minoan), 1600 B.C.:

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Crete (Minoan), early 2000s B.C.:

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Romania, 34,000 B.C.:

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The time when “EVERYONE” in Europe was White does not exist. They knew what people with brown skin looked like because they were there. They knew what “Africans” looked like because they were there, and they weren’t “they”, they were us, or you. I think what you’re missing is something that never existed.

Reblogged from Lalalaalalalaaaaaaaa
Reblogged from Lalalaalalalaaaaaaaa

Up Close: Robe de Style 1920s (X)

Up Close: Robe de Style 1920s (X)

Reblogged from Fashions From History

lohrien:

Paintings by David Cheifetz

Reblogged from STILL ALIVE

fashionstatus101:

Back to School!! Cute look with those in style leather boots or of coarse scarves..even got some flannel in there! 

Reblogged from FashionStatus
fashionsfromhistory:

Hunting Sword
1740s
Germany

fashionsfromhistory:

Hunting Sword

1740s

Germany

Reblogged from Fashions From History
ohnoitshelen:

Rami Kadi 2014 Vintage Collection

ohnoitshelen:

Rami Kadi 2014 Vintage Collection

Reblogged from the helen blog
Reblogged from Darli AUNG Arts
Reblogged from Girl stuff
Reblogged from Late Autumn Nights

asylum-art:

Kovacs Anna Brigitta

Facebook| Saatchi Art | deviantART

"I have always loved to create art. When I was in fifth grade, my art teacher called me the "Queen of Colors"  and that further encouraged me me to continue working on my dream to become an artist. After graduating from a high school specialized on art and textile design, I majored at art in college. My field of specialty is watercolor and oil because I love the fluidity this medium enables me to capture.
 
I consider interpreting the beauty of the natural and the man-made world my mission in life because I hope to bring joy to people.”

Reblogged from art & amanda

nyhistory:

August 30, 1790: President and Mrs. Washington leave New York as the nation’s capital moves to Philadelphia.

Rembrandt Peale (1778–1860), George Washington, 1853. Oil on canvas. New-York Historical Society, Bequest of Caroline Phelps Stokes, 1910.3

Rembrandt Peale (1778–1860), Martha Washington, 1853. Oil on canvas. New-York Historical Society, Bequest of Caroline Phelps Stokes, 1910.2

I’m going to his house on Wednesday

Reblogged from Historical Times